February Image Contest

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Networking Neuron
by Dr. Patrick Nahirney & Ryan Heron
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http://neuroart.com/february-image-contest-2018/?contest=photo-detail&photo_id=1445
89
575
Title:
Networking Neuron

Author:
Dr. Patrick Nahirney & Ryan Heron

Description:
Immunofluorescence microscopy of differentiating cultured neurons (N2A cell line, 5 days differentiation) labeled with tubulin (green) and synaptic vesicle glycoprotein (red) antibodies. Nuclei are stained blue with DAPI. A large elaborate network of neurite outgrowths from this large neuron reach out to make contact with its neighbours. Tubulin forms the main intracellular cytoskeletal transport railway for trafficking of proteins and synaptic vesicles to the distal ends of the neurite outgrowths where synapses are formed. Neurotransmitter-containing vesicles are produced in the cell body (note red stain near nucleus) and are shuttled to the tips of the neurites along the microtubules where they get released to signal neighbouring cells. Imaged at 40x magnification on an IX-81 Olympus microscope and captured with a Photometrics Coolsnap HQ2 camera. Credits: Dr. Patrick Nahirney and Ryan Heron. Division of Medical Sciences, University of Victoria
Description:
Immunofluorescence microscopy of differentiating cultured neurons (N2A cell line, 5 days differentiation) labeled with tubulin (green) and synaptic vesicle glycoprotein (red) antibodies. Nuclei are stained blue with DAPI. A large elaborate network of neurite outgrowths from this large neuron reach out to make contact with its neighbours. Tubulin forms the main intracellular cytoskeletal transport railway for trafficking of proteins and synaptic vesicles to the distal ends of the neurite outgrowths where synapses are formed. Neurotransmitter-containing vesicles are produced in the cell body (note red stain near nucleus) and are shuttled to the tips of the neurites along the microtubules where they get released to signal neighbouring cells. Imaged at 40x magnification on an IX-81 Olympus microscope and captured with a Photometrics Coolsnap HQ2 camera. Credits: Dr. Patrick Nahirney and Ryan Heron. Division of Medical Sciences, University of Victoria